HP Lovecraft in Modern English

the-horrorI’ve just added a new modern English adaptation of HP Lovecraft’s The Dunwich Horror. It’s based on the author’s original, which is available from Project Gutenberg for free since it’s out of copyright. The original was written early in the twentieth century. HP Lovecraft’s work is still readable, but he uses many words that are no longer in common use, his sentence structures are archaic, and he constantly injects softening words like ‘seemed’. My adaptation attempts to preserve his story while making it easy to read.

Here’s a before after example, taken from the horribly accented dialog in the original.

Before:

“I dun’t keer what folks think—ef Lavinny’s boy looked like his pa, he wouldn’t look like nothin’ ye expeck. Ye needn’t think the only folks is the folks hereabouts. Lavinny’s read some, an’ has seed some things the most o’ ye only tell abaout. I calc’late her man is as good a husban’ as ye kin find this side of Aylesbury; an’ ef ye knowed as much abaout the hills as I dew, ye wouldn’t ast no better church weddin’ nor her’n. Let me tell ye suthin’—some day yew folks’ll hear a child o’ Lavinny’s a-callin’ its father’s name on the top o’ Sentinel Hill!

After:

“I don’t care what folks think—if Lavinny’s boy looked like his pa, he wouldn’t look like anything you’d expect. You shouldn’t think the only folks are the folks hereabouts. Lavinny’s read some, and has seen some things the most of you only talk about. I’d say her man is as good a husband as you can find this side of Aylesbury. If you knew as much about the hills as I do, you wouldn’t ask for a better church wedding nor hearing. Let me tell you something—some day you folks’ll hear a child of Lavinny’s calling its father’s name on the top of Sentinel Hill!

About jimbelton

I'm a software developer, and a writer of both fiction and non-fiction, and I blog about movies, books, and philosophy. My interest in religious philosophy and the search for the truth inspires much of my writing.
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