Psalm 2: A Prophecy of the Messiah

psalm2The second psalm is a warning to unbelievers of the coming kingdom of heaven on earth, to be ruled over by Yahweh’s chosen king, who he has exalted as his own son. Christians (notably Luke in the book of Acts) claim, of course, that this psalm is referring to Jesus. Here it is:

Why do the heathens rage, and the people imagine futile things? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against Yahweh, and against his messiah.

“Let us break their bonds apart, and cast their chains from us,” they say.

He that sits in Heaven shall laugh. The Lord shall deride them. Then shall he speak his wrath to them, and anger them in his sore displeasure.

“I have set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. I make this decree” Yahweh will say. “You are my Son; today have I begotten you. Ask it of me, and I shall give you the heathen as your inheritance, and the farthest parts of the earth as your possessions. You shall break them with a rod of iron. You shall dash them to pieces like clay vessels.”

Be wise now therefore, oh you kings: be instructed, you judges of the earth. Serve Yahweh with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and you perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled just a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.

This is a warning to the secular powers who eschew the law of the Torah as bondage that Yahweh is going to create his kingdom of heaven on earth, place his messiah upon the throne on mount Zion, declare him to be the Son of God, and give him dominion over all men and the entire earth. The kings and judges of the earth, the temporal powers, are then adjured to kiss the Son and put their trust in him.

About jimbelton

I'm a software developer, and a writer of both fiction and non-fiction, and I blog about movies, books, and philosophy. My interest in religious philosophy and the search for the truth inspires much of my writing.
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