Tales of the Kingdom: The Three Servants

story-timea lord traveled to a far country. Before he left, he called his servants before him, and entrusted them with his goods. To the first, he gave five talents (the worth of 650 pounds of silver), to the second, two, and to the third, one, giving to each servant according to his ability. Then he left straightway on his journey.

The first servant went and traded with the money he’d been given, and made another five talents. Likewise, the second servant made another two. But the servant who had received only one talent went and dug a hole in the ground, and hid his lord’s money.

After a long time, the lord returned, and called for his servants. The first came and brought him the ten talents he had.

Lord,” he said, “you entrusted me with five talents. I have made five more beside them.”

Well done,” the lord said. “You are a good and faithful servant. I will put you in charge of many things. I am overjoyed with you.”

The second servant came and brought him the four talents that he had.

Lord,” he said, “you entrusted me with two talents. I have made two more beside them.”

Well done,” the lord said. “You are a good and faithful servant. I will put you in charge of many things. I am overjoyed with you.”

Then the third servant came before his lord.

Lord,” he said, “I know that you are a hard man, reaping where you have not sown. I was afraid, and hid your money. Now, I return it to you.”

You are a wicked and lazy servant,” said the lord. “You knew that I seek to profit from my wealth, and not merely my lands. You ought to at least have given my money to the bankers, and then on my return I should have received what was mine with interest.”

He took the talent from the third servant, and give it to the first servant, and had the unprofitable servant cast out into the darkness.

Jesus gives the moral of the story as: “To every one that has, more shall be given, and he shall have abundance; but from he that does not, even what he has shall be taken away.” On the surface, this seems horrible. But when you understand what the first servant had the the third one did not, it makes perfect sense. And that quality is faith:

Have faith, and you will have abundance; without faith, you will lose what little you have.

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About jimbelton

I'm a software developer, and a writer of both fiction and non-fiction, and I blog about movies, books, and philosophy. My interest in religious philosophy and the search for the truth inspires much of my writing.
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